Welcome to Three Rivers

Interview with Pauline Glessner former Employee and Patient

We had the great opportunity to sit down with former employee and patient of Three Rivers Hospital, Pauline Glessner. Pauline is the mother of our Employee Health Nurse, Carla Boyd. It was a pleasure to spend time with Pauline and hear her story. We hope you will enjoy spending a couple minutes with this lovely lady.

KOZI Radio interview with COO Melanie Neddo

This week our COO Melanie Neddo was feature for an interview on KOZI Radio. Melanie spoke with 2nd Cup of Coffee host Jay Witherbee about the roll of rural hospitals in our community. Melanie and Jay also discussed our Family Medicine clinic and the services we provide to the community through the clinic.

We invite you to listen and learn more about Melanie as well as some of the service we provide for you and the community.

New Beds Await Patients at TRH

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Three Rivers Hospital Plant Manager Rob Wylie, far right, gets ready to help unload new Stryker S3 patient beds on December 29.

Three Rivers Hospital is already following through on its promise to invest in the facility when voters approved a levy lid lift in August. The hospital celebrated the start of the new year with the arrival of 18 brand new patient beds, and more furniture will arrive within the next month.

According to Chief Financial Officer Jennifer Munson, the ability to replace all of the hospital’s outdated patient furniture has been a long time coming.

“This will be the first time in over 20 years that we have replaced furniture,” she said. “This is a very exciting purchase for us. To be able to replace beds that are over 40 years old with new, more comfortable beds that have the technological capabilities to help us deliver safe patient care is a huge step in a positive direction.

“This purchase was centered around the patient and really supports our mission of leading the innovation of safe and respectful patient care.”

The Board of Commissioners authorized Munson to sign a lease agreement with Stryker in November for of about $319,000. As part of the agreement Stryker waived the taxes and freight fees, a savings of nearly $20,000. In addition, Stryker provided free upgrades to iBed technology and deluxe mattresses that come with a 10-year warranty.

Stryker 4

The new Stryker beds offer more safety features and a modern look compared to the hospital’s older beds, seen in the background.

Stryker delivered the S3 medical/surgical beds on December 29; they immediately were placed in the acute care wing. Within the next few weeks the hospital is expecting the rest of the furniture: two maternity beds, 21 patient chairs, 21 over-bed tables, 21 bedside stands, one recliner bed, one treatment recliner, one loveseat sleeper, four newborn bassinettes, and three TruRize power chairs.

The new beds and TruRize chairs will lend to greater safety for patients as well as nurses. The chairs offer improved mobility for patients without placing physical strain on nurses, and the iBed technology includes anti-fall warning lights and sounds to help protect high risk patients.

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Surgery Tech Jose Bucio helps set up one of the new Stryker patient beds on December 29.

As the new furniture is moved in, employees are working on giving patient rooms a makeover with fresh paint and new fire-retardant curtains.

Meanwhile, hospital administration continues to work toward the other goals outlined to voters: relocating the emergency department to a more appropriate space in the hospital that is currently used for clinical services; upgrading the heating, ventilating and air conditioning system to be compliant with state Department of Health regulations; replacing sections of the roof directly over patient care areas; and investing in staff training. One area is being converted into an education room so staff and providers can keep up on their credentials and current care techniques without needing to travel.

These projects are slated to begin this year with the help of engineering firm McKinstry.

Three Rivers is also working with Stryker on a package to upgrade surgical suite equipment, Munson said.

TRH Yard Sale on Oct. 6, 2016

Three Rivers Hospital is holding a yard sale on Thursday, October 6, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m., in the McKinley Building at 507 Hospital Way in Brewster, WA 98812.

These items were approved as surplus by the Board of Commissioners on Sept. 27, 2016.

 

Metal packing tape dispensers – 2

Light gray adjustable lamp with cord

Countertop cabinet w/ drawer and white cupboard with tan marbled top

Blaster Advantage label printer

Swingline heavy duty stapler

Stanley Bostitch heavy duty stapler

Bates heavy duty stapler

Medical sky hook (possibly for PT traction)

Body composition analyzer by Tanita Corp.

Tall back office chair by Ikea (note: leans back without stopping)

M/S medical pump w/case

Giant scope optical light by American Opticals Corp.

Lighted eye and ear scope w/black case by AD2

Dual-channel iontophoresis system by Dupel

Procto desizzation set by Birtcher Corp.

Wooden box

Ohmeda monitor by Louisville Company

Four-leg IV pole (note: rusted underneath)

Mirrors, approx. 14×18 inches – 2

White sink, no faucet

Metal sink w/tall faucet and cabinet

White shelf, approx. 24×36 inches

Desktop vanity w/etched glass cabinets

Stereo 8-track player by Sound Design

Stereo 8-track player by True Tone

White toilet w/tank

White sink w/faucet and hoses

Waiting area style chair w/wooden frame, gray fabric

Metal frame chair, dark blue

Three-drawer filing cabinet, tan by Norwalk

Wall mount automatic soap dispenser by Provon

Black plastic shelving – 4

Possible cassette case, brown w/handle

Voice tube assembly, Plantronics Sound Innovation

Pink Recliner, IV Therapy chair by Invacare

Three-chip video camera system by Smith & Nephew – 2

Surgery cabinets – multiple

Desks – 2

Nursing station chart holder/carousel

Five-drawer filing cabinet, burnt orange by Conserv-A-File

File Master index card size filing cabinet on top, two-drawer filing cabinet on bottom, light blue metal

Three-drawer cabinet

Master Files filing drawers, total of 6

Employee lockers by Republic Storage System – 3

Physical therapy hot packs

Over door traction set by Sun Mark

Dyonics Power by Smith & Nephew

SCD machine, orange (broken) by HuntLeigh Healthcare

Patient television (broken) by Memorex

Wheelchair by Imbacare

Hydrocollator lotion warmer by Chattanooga Pharmacal Co.

Hydrocollator hot pack warmer by Chattanooga Pharmacal Co.

Hemoglobin Photo Meter w/red plastic case by Hemocue

Black plastic shelving

Spiral book maker and plastic binding combs

Adjustable limb elevator

Pulmomate compressor nebulizer by Debilbiss

Call button w/cord

Medi-Mech tall metal cabinet w/adjustable plate on top (note: large and heavy)

Sole supporters foot impression kit by Biomechanically Correct

Plastic filing drawers, small

Pulse oximeter by Oxi-Pleth

Therapeutic ultrasound generator by Chattanooga Corp.

Operating pump generator by Silent Surgical Tech

Electrical surgical unit by Olympus

Mini-refrigerator by Chef Mate

Color video monitor by Sony

Vital signs monitor by Synamap – 2

Rolling metal cart w/drawer

Duracuff thigh cuff by CritiKon

Pediatric infant cuff by CritiKon

Eight-battery basket w/handles and charger stand by Welch Allyn

Endoscopy power supply

Stryker system 5

Electrosurgical foot switch by Valley Lab

Hyfrecator by Birtcher Corp.

Force 2 electrosurgical generator by Valley Lab

Silver standing pole lamp w/white glass shade

Multifunctional cosmetic warmer w/mirror, purple w/green handle by UZ01 International

Mini-fridge II by Bockel Scientific

Volumetric Infusion Pump by Baxter-Colleague-CX – 3

ECG w/rolling pole and basket by Hewlett Packard

Bair Hugger w/hose and blanket by Augustine Medical – 2

Bacti-Cinerator cylinder, green base w/stand by Scientific Products

Sliding keyboard tray, black by Fellowes

Blood pressure stand/meter w/cuff, mercury style

Monitor by Sony

Dermatone Meshgraft

Vacuum regulators by Chemetron – 2

Suction Regu-Gauge by Chemetron – 2

Yellow X-ray date label by Veriad – 2

Green border label by Veriad – 2

White left oblique MLO label by VAL – 6

White “left CC” label by VAL – 6

Electronic cash registry by Sharp Corp.

Digital synthesized tuner w/two speakers by Magnavox

Compact CD player by Persidian

Portable lamp by Underwriters Laboratory

Cash registry by Royal

Stepping stool, orange (note: defective)

Refrigerator/freezer by Gibson

Refrigerator by Kelvinator

Surgitron vapor machine in rolling cart by Euman

ECG machine w/rolling pole and basket by Hewlett Packard

Braun Electro Dermatone

Telemetry transmitters by Hewlett Packard – 2

Mammography Phantom by Nuclear Associates

Emergency Assistance sign

Microsoft Office

Basic 2007 disc

Sensitometer by X-Rite – 2

Anti-static fluid by Xerox – 2

Ice machine (note: broken)

X-ray labels by The St. John Companies – 29

Video cassette EG by Scotch

Video for breast self-examinations by the Susan G. Komen Foundation

White “right CC” label by VAL – 3

Right oblique MLO label by VAL – 6

Left oblique MLO label by VAL – 3

Red sparkly Christmas ornament

Green sparkly Christmas ornament

Red Christmas ornament w/green sparkles

Green Christmas ornament w/red sparkles

Gold Christmas ornament

Felt Christmas tree skirt

Box of Christmas lights – 2

Toy Santa

Bible – The New Testament

Label fuser cleaner – 7

Antique stapler by Swingline

Plastic tote w/three drawers

Video tape – 38

Blue plastic barrel

Dopplex

Portable oxygen tank by Norco

Plantronics CS50

Green blanket

Cryo-Fridge by Rebco

Gurney w/oxygen tank by Midmark

Mammography film, 18×24 by Kodak

Cassettes, 8×10 by Kodak – 15

Cassettes, 10×17 by Kodak – 21

Cassettes, 14×17 by Kodak – 9

DVD player by Sony

Foot pedal by Hamilton Industries

Pink cabinet, approx. 4×5 feet

Yellow cabinet, approx. 3×6 feet

Tan cabinet, approx. 4×5 feet

Cast cutter by Stryker

Box of various cassettes

Box of various mammography cassettes

Desk drawers – 4

Air conditioning unit (note: no unit cover or faceplate) by Tecumseh

Calibration syringe, 3 liter by Hans Rudolph, Inc.

Fluid warmers by Level I Technologies – 2

Television by Zenith

Blood bank cryo-fridge by Revco

Light reader by GE

Centrifuge by Quest Diagnostics

Ice machine lid

Lab analyzer by Hermle

Mammography machine by Lorad

Ear & eye scopes w/charger by Welch Allyn – 3

Heat lamp by Graham-Field

Two-way safe lamp by Kodak

Bats & Rabies: Taking Precautions at Home

Compiled by Jeremy Vandelac, Ancillary Manager
Three Rivers Hospital

Chelan and Grant counties have recently found bats infected with rabies, and Spokane County also found a rabid bat.  batOne of the bats in Grant County bit a person removing the cover off of a boat; it was the first known human case in Washington since 1997.  Within the past 25 years, four domestic animals in Washington have been diagnosed with rabies, and by law, all cats, dogs, and ferrets are required to be vaccinated against rabies (WAC 246-100-197).  So with that said, the rate is very low, with less than 1% of bats in the wild having rabies.  Still, it is extremely important to never touch a bat.  We’d like all of our hospital district residents and visitors to be aware of what to do if they encounter a bat. The below information has been compiled from Grant and Chelan-Douglas County Health District emails and informational materials.

 

What is considered a bat encounter?

  • A bite, scratch, or saliva in your eyes, nose, mouth or fresh wound.
  • Finding a bat in the same room of a person who might be unaware that a bite or direct contact occurred (i.e.: a person sleeping or an unattended child).

 

What should I do if I have an encounter with a bat?

  • If you have been bitten, immediately wash the bite site with plenty of soap and lots of running warm water for a minimum of 10 minutes, then seek immediate medical attention.
  • Report the encounter to Chelan-Douglas Health District, Monday – Thursday (509) 886-6400. After hours or weekends, please call (509) 886-6499.  For Okanogan County, call (509) 422-7140 or 911 after hours.
  • If possible, catch the bat safely, avoiding direct contact. Use heavy leather gloves, a net, and tongs. Put it in a can or a bucket and tightly cover it with a lid. Do not damage the head of the bat because the brain is needed for testing.
  • Bats should be captured only if there has been direct contact with a person or pet, or if the bat was found in the room of someone who might have been bitten. Once these bats are captured, they should be tested for rabies infection. Do not release a live bat or throw out a dead bat that has bitten or scratched, or has had direct contact with a person, unless instructed to do so by public health.

Keep bats out of your house!  Bats must not be allowed into your home. It’s best to contact animal control or a wildlife conservation agency for assistance with “bat-proofing” your home.  If you choose to “bat-proof” your house yourself, here are some suggestions:

  • Carefully examine your home for holes that might allow bats entry into your living quarters.
  • Use window screens, chimney caps, and draft-guards beneath doors to attics, fill electrical and plumbing holes with stainless steel wool or caulking, and ensure that all doors to the outside close tightly.
  • Prevent bats from roosting in attics or buildings by covering outside entry points.
  • More information on “bat-proofing” can he found here: http://www.batcon.org.

More information on bat exposure, what to do if you find a bat in your home or cabin, what to do if you are bitten by a bat, and how to avoid exposure to rabies can be found at:

Additional information about rabies:

July is UV Safety Month!

Summer

The sun may be about 93 million miles away, but many of us are well acquainted with the damage it can do to our skin and our overall health if we aren’t careful.  In honor of UV Safety Month, here are a few facts and tips to keep in mind:

UV-B rays reach the outer layer of your skin. UV-A rays can penetrate the middle layer of your skin.  It’s important to protect yourself against both types.

UV rays are strongest between 10 a.m. and 4 p.m.  During this time of day, try to avoid being in direct sunlight for prolonged periods of time.

Skin cancer and premature aging are well-known risks of unprotected sun exposure, but UV rays can also suppress your immune system.

One in five Americans will develop skin cancer in their lifetime, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

Certain kinds of drugs, including anti-inflammatory medications like ibuprofen, can increase sun sensitivity.

Apply a palm full of sunscreen — at least SPF 30 — every two hours, or after swimming or sweating, even if the sunscreen claims to be waterproof.

Wear sunglasses! Over time, heightened UV exposure can cause cataracts and even cancer of the eye or eyelid, according to The Vision Council.

If you must spend time in the sun, wear long sleeves and pants, and a wide-brimmed hat.

Tanning is not guaranteed protection against sunburn, and definitely doesn’t guard you against harm from UV rays. Research suggests that prolonged UV exposure damages your skin cells’ DNA, according to SkinCancer.org. Try using tinted lotions to achieve a sun-kissed look rather than using tanning beds or spending time in the sun without sunscreen.

April is National Donate Life Month!

Are you an organ donor? Currently, nearly 124,000 men, women and children are awaiting organ transplants in the United States, according to Donate Life America.

In 2015, the Organ Procurement and Transplantation Network reported that the United States set a new milestone for life-saving organ transplants, with nearly 31,000 people receiving new kidneys, livers, and other organs.

For more information on how to become a donor, contribute financially, or volunteer for the cause, visit http://donatelife.net/.